book report: october 2017

84B5215C-A91D-44DE-860D-7F6651BF2382.JPG

I was aiming to read more this month, but it didn't happen for whatever reason. I did get to read three books, though, and loved them all so that's good!

final girls by riley sager
This was the most unexpectedly perfect autumn read! Mostly, it's a thriller (which is perfect for October, don't you think?) about three girls who were the lone survivors in three respective massacres and are now dubbed 'Final Girls'. It's a fast-paced, thrilling storyline that had me finish the book in just a few hours. But, it's perfect for fall not only because of the thriller plot. It's set in the autumn in New York and the main character is a baking blogger, so there are lots of descriptive scenes of baking apple dumplings and cupcakes throughout the mystery. I really, really liked this one!

a study in charlotte by brittany cavallaro
This is the first in a series about Charlotte Holmes and Jamie Watson, respective descendants of Sherlock and Dr. John Watson in a hypothetical world where those characters were real people. Charlotte and Jamie attend the same boarding school in Connecticut where a murder occurs and they find themselves being framed. As I've said before, I'm not typically a YA reader but I really enjoyed this one. Once you start to get into it, the story is fast-paced and great for autumn. If this were ever to become a movie, I could totally see Adelaide Kane playing Charlotte.

night film by marisha pessl
This was my second time reading Night Film and I'm so glad read it again! Like Final Girls, this book is a perfect October pick and not just because it's set during the month. It follows a disgraced investigative journalist and two young, scrappy 'assistants' as they look into the mysterious death of Ashley Cordova, daughter of a cult horror film director. The story weaves in and out of Manhattan and has lots of great, spooky themes like ancient witchcraft, sanatoriums, horror films, and sprawling private estates. This one is on the longer side, but it's so gripping that it doesn't feel as long as it is.