book report: june 2018

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Goal Progress: 20/50

Again, sorry for being missing the past two weeks! I'm working out whether I should cut down on my posting schedule since I'm now busy with a lot of other projects. But today, I'm back to talk about what I read this month.

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
I'd been hearing about this book for months as I waited for it to become available at the library and was so excited when I finally got to bring it home. It's about a small utopic, affluent neighborhood in Ohio and a family there that's shaken up when a new tenant and her daughter move into their rental property. The entire town is then shaken up when an adoption custody dispute occurs between a wealthy couple and their baby's biological mother. So, I did enjoy this book and thought there were a lot of interesting things going on. I will say that if you're expecting a fast-paced, dramatic novel, that isn't what you're going to get it. Instead, it's really a book of character portraits and small town dynamics. I'm usually a diehard fan of character studies and atmospheric novels, but my feelings about this one were kind of just lukewarm to be honest!

The Magnolia Story by Chip & Joanna Gaines
I'm, of course, a fan of Fixer Upper and knew a bit about the couple's background but this book was a really interesting history about how Chip & Joanna met and built their business (why haven't they been on How I Built This yet??). There was a great chapter on surviving versus thriving that I think everyone needs to read. The book is under 200 pages so it's perfect for a quick read.

Raving Fans by Kenneth Blanchard
I read this for work, actually. It's super short and kind of silly, but it really does describe the goals of excellent customer service. I often think about how I'd like to hand it out to every person I encounter who gives subpar customer service. Haha.

Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny
I started reading this over a year ago because I owned the book, but somehow it disappeared so I wasn't able to read it until it was finally in at a library. It's the sixth book in the Chief Inspector Gamache series and it's really the antithesis of a summer book, but it's so good. It's set in the dead of winter in Montreal and goes back and forth between two storylines, one of which is about the inspector trying to solve the murder of an infamous historian and the other is about a terrorism case that went wrong in the inspector's past.